School Autonomy Toolset
for equity and learning

An enabling school leadership environment is reflected in the room for flexibility and autonomy granted to school leaders for making important decisions that aim to identify and respond to concrete school needs in relation equity and learning challenges.




Data on school autonomy for equity and learning

Sound policy planning on school autonomy for equity and learning needs to take into consideration research-based evidence on the level of autonomy schools have to take decisions that may affect equity and learning.

What we mean by School Autonomy?

School autonomy is a term used to indicate that schools and school-level actors have been given some room for manoeuvre to take their own decisions in managing schools and dealing with everyday equity, teaching and learning challenges, and that constrains from the outside - and inside - are reduced to the necessary and legitimate frames, values and norms.

Indicator on school autonomy in the organization of instruction
Map 1: Percentage of decisions on the organization of instruction* taken at school level in public lower secondary education (Source: OECD, Education at a Glance 2012) .
*Including: School choice, School attended, Pupils' school careers, Grouping of pupils, Choice of textbooks, Choice of software/learningware, Instruction time, Teaching methods, Assessment of pupils' regular work, Assistance to pupils.
NOTES: GB data include only England; in Scotland it is 78%. For Belgium the data refer to Flanders. In the French community it is 78%.
See data table at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888932668527








See data table TD6.6a at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888932668489
Supporting Document
Indicator-based analysis on school autonomy

School autonomy from the perspective of school principals


Indicator on school autonomy in student assessment policies
Map 2: Percentage of students in schools whose principals reported that only "principals and/or teachers" have a considerable responsibility for establishing student assessment policies
(Source: OECD 2013, PISA 2012 Results: What Makes Schools Successful? Resources, Policies and Practices, Volume IV).
NOTE: OECD average: 47%.
See Figure IV.4.3 at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888932957346


Indicator on school autonomy in choosing textbooks
Map 3: Percentage of students in schools whose principals reported that only "principals and/or teachers" have a considerable responsibility in choosing which textbooks are used
(Source: OECD 2013, PISA 2012 Results: What Makes Schools Successful? Resources, Policies and Practices, Volume IV).
NOTE: OECD average: 65%.
See Figure IV.4.3 at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888932957346


Indicator on school autonomy in determining course content
Map 4: Percentage of students in schools whose principals reported that only "principals and/or teachers" have a considerable responsibility in determining course content
(Source: OECD 2013, PISA 2012 Results: What Makes Schools Successful? Resources, Policies and Practices, Volume IV).
NOTE: OECD average: 40%.
See Figure IV.4.3 at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888932957346


Indicator on school autonomy in determining which courses are offered
Map 5: Percentage of students in schools whose principals reported that only "principals and/or teachers" have a considerable responsibility in deciding which courses are offered
(Source: OECD 2013, PISA 2012 Results: What Makes Schools Successful? Resources, Policies and Practices, Volume IV).
NOTE: OECD average: 36%.
See Figure IV.4.3 at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/888932957346


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